COVID-19 Response Information Hub

The COVID-19 pandemic is challenging society on every front – social, political, and economic. Disadvantaged youth populations face significant challenges as their already precarious access to resources and supports dwindles and/or vanishes.

This information hub organizes COVID-19 relevant resources by youth population & supports for parents, with new resources added on weekly basis. We recognize that many young people fall into multiple categories. We will share the challenges being experienced, as well as resources provided by a variety of organizations.

In addition to the resources below, check out AYPF’s work on COVID-19:

Deeper Learning in the Time of COVID-19 Webinar Series

  • Part 1: New Hampshire (Tuesday, 6/9 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm ET)
  • Part 2: Virginia (coming soon)
  • Part 3: California (coming soon)

Blog post(s)

We would also appreciate you sharing resources for our consideration via this online form, which we may include in future updates. We also invite you to share resources on Twitter using the hashtag #AYPFCOVID19.

Week 1: Justice-Involved Youth

Resources from Organizations

  • Incarcerated students are used to distance learning but the pandemic is still disrupting their education
  • The Sentencing Project – for a daily update of COVID-19 diagnoses in juvenile facilities follow https://twitter.com/JoshRovner
  • This blog by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) notes that the COVID-19 response must include youth and adults impacted by the criminal justice system
  • The National Juvenile Justice Network offers a range of resources related to COVID-19 and vulnerable populations
  • The National Commission on Correctional Health Care and researchers from Harvard University are gathering information on how COVID-19 is affecting correctional facilities
  • This blog  post from the Campaign for Youth Justice summarizes actions taken nationwide, at the state and local level, to remove youth from secure custody during the pandemic
  • Here’s a guide for young adults about the Economic Impact Payments provided through the Treasury in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It explains how to find out if you qualify for a payment, what to do if you don’t get one automatically, and where to get answers

State and County Actions/Resources

  • Juvenile Agency Chiefs have joined juvenile justice advocates in calling for the immediate release of youths in juvenile detention facilities to protect them from COVID-19
  • In Los Angeles County there has been a call to release kids from juvenile facilities
  • This story describes California’s efforts to protect inmates against COVID-19, including releasing 3,500 inmates early

 

Policy Guidance

  • The California Department of Justice has weighed in on freeing youth in lockups, reminding officials about the authority they already possess 
  • Policy guidance from VERA Institute of Justice – guidance for preventive and responsive measures to coronavirus for jails, prisons, immigration detention and youth facilities
  • This site from No Kids in Prison contains youth justice advocacy resources, including state advocacy actions and tools, system responses to COVID-19 and Cases Reported in Juvenile Facilities, State Litigation, Polling, Practitioner and Policymaker Statements, National Partners and Allies Actions and Statements, and Federal Actions
  • Research-to-Policy Collaboration curates resources cultivated by researchers on behalf of policymakers at state and national levels. Specifically, these resources are designed to think creatively about ways policymakers could support children and families during the pandemic.

Media Coverage

  • Justice experts in over 30 states demand the release of incarcerated youth during COVID-19 crisis
  • Heartfelt Appeal on Behalf of Incarcerated Youth During Pandemic, by David Domenici, founder of the Center for Educational Excellence in Alternative Settings 
  • Stories from The Chronicle of Social Change on coronavirus and its impact on children, youth and families (March 13 – April 10, 2020) 
  • Cut off from their kids, parents of juvenile detainees wait and worry as coronavirus spreads
  • Early data about how the coronavirus is already appearing in juvenile detention centers – experts say it will get worse unless children are released 
  • This resource highlights the COVID-19 outbreak in a Cook County, IL jail including a relevant graph regarding detainees who tested positive
  • 1,000 Inmates Will Be Released from NJ Jails to Curb Coronavirus Risk – the consent order filed to commute or suspend county jail sentences can be found here
  • Michigan juvenile lifer died of coronavirus in prison was weeks away from parole

Week 2: English Language Learners (ELL)

Resources from Organizations

  • These resources and recommendations provided by the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) can help educators of ELLs, as well as parents and caregivers. We encourage you to check these sites to learn which apps, platforms, and other resources are recommended by advocates and experts
  • Resources for district- and school-level leaders with recommendations and guidance on what to consider as they aim to meet the needs of ELL students
  • From now until June, @VATESOL1 is hosting virtual town hall meetings every Wednesday from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET as a way to connect and share strategies for supporting ELL students during extended school closures
  • The Second Language Teaching and Research Center at the University of Utah (L2TREC) developed a page with a collection of resources to aid parents, teachers, caregivers and students as they navigate language learning in non-traditional settings
  • The Ethnic Minorities of Burma Advocacy and Resource Center (EMBARC) in Iowa created a website for information on COVID-19. It includes information in Burmese, Chin-Hakha, Chin-Mizo, French, Karen, Karenni, Kirundi, Kunama, Lingala, and Swahili.
  • The North Carolina English Learners Teacher Network leaders share blog entries on some topics they are passionate about. They include links to resources that may be used in different settings serving ELL students and their families.
  • A curated guide that includes a specific focus on supporting ELL students, students in dual language, and multilingual families. The guide for families is available in English, Spanish, Amharic, French Vietnamese, Korean, and Chinese.
  • This website features interactive maps including information about the characteristics and location of ELLs.
  • Check out these dual language glossaries from New York University with examples and translations in over 20 languages.
  • The U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences funds a network of 10 Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs). In response to COVID-19, the RELs have collaborated to produce this series of evidence-based resources and guidance about teaching and learning in a remote environment, as well as other considerations brought by the pandemic.
  • Here’s a guide for young adults about the Economic Impact Payments provided through the Treasury in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It explains how to find out if you qualify for a payment, what to do if you don’t get one automatically, and where to get answers

State and County Actions/Resources

  • California currently has the largest percentage of ELL student enrollment in grades K-12 in the country at almost 25 percent, or 1,521,772 students. The state also accounts for one-third of the districts with the highest concentration of ELL students in the United States, the largest of these being the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) at 152,592 students. Here is a list of useful resources and programs for ELL students living in California
  • Californians Together, a statewide alliance for parents, teachers, administrators and civil rights advocacy organizations, developed a resource page for ELL families in California
  • Guilford County Schools in North Carolina established an information hotline staffed with interpreters who speak seven languages to support ELL families
  • This New York Times article highlights many efforts undertaken in California and other states to support ELL students and families

Policy Guidance

  • Organizations across the nation are requesting $1 billion in supplemental funding to help districts and states meet the needs of ELL students enrolled in the nation’s public k-12 schools
  • Research-to-Policy Collaboration curates resources cultivated by researchers on behalf of policymakers at state and national levels. Specifically, these resources are designed to think creatively about ways policymakers could support children and families during the pandemic.

Resources for Educators

  • Teaching While Muslim provides suggestions on what teachers should consider during distance learning related to Ramadan
  • New York State’s Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) share six SEL practices for teachers who are teaching remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Language Practice Choice Board – Resource for teachers that allows students to select activities that interest them and those that they have the resources to complete
  • Colorin Colorado offers a variety of resources for educators related to the celebration of Ramadan including book recommendations, tips, short films, etc.
  • ESL Teacher Support Guide

Websites, Games and Other Interactive Tools

  • bilingual site for educators and families with resources for ELL students
  • Duolingo is a fun language learning platform — exercises are tailored to help users learn and review vocabulary effectively
  • Sesame Street offers games, videos, and activities for children
  • Sésamo provides games, videos and activities for children in Spanish
  • Common Sense provides teachers with free resources to enhance students’ online learning including free, evidence-based lesson plans in English and Spanish
  • Arbol ABC offers more than 500+ free interactive games for different subjects including games for ELL students
  • TalkingPoints is a multilingual family engagement platform that helps educators stay connected with students, reach families, and get the most critical information out to communities. They are providing free resources for educators and families to support students’ learning during COVID-19
  • ACT is providing free resources to help students, educators, and families access blended and online SEL programs through the end of June
  • This Fast Fact Sheet focuses on responses from parents in three language categories: households where neither parent speaks English, households where both parents speak English, and households where one of two parents speaks English and the other speaks another language
  • The Inter-Agency Standing Committee captured the mental health and psychosocial needs of students and families during COVID-19. This is a story developed for and by children around the world
  • (Teresa Garcia, a mother who was still learning English and set out on a campaign to ensure other ELL families did not feel as hopeless.)

Media Coverage

  • Effects of the coronavirus outbreak on how New York ELL students learn and on how educators teach
  • In California, 6,000 ELL students and families in the Coachella Valley Unified School District face food insecurity challenges due to COVID-19. This article features a map displaying all distribution sites in Coachella Valley

Week 3: Youth in Foster Care

Resources from Organizations

  • iFoster is currently offering technology access to foster youth ages 13-24, which include: free, unlimited, high-speed data hotspots, headsets, and laptops to assist in taking online classes. For additional information on the resources that they have, call iFoster at 1-855-936-7837 or email at phone@ifoster.org
  • In this webinar, Dr. Mauriell Amechi covers what foster care is and the leading factors that contribute to foster care entry. Other topics include demographic characteristics among youth in foster care; national trends across the public foster care system; outcomes among college students with foster care experience; and measures that colleges, states, and policymakers can implement to assist these students during COVID-19.
  • If you are, or were previously, in foster care and need a laptop for remote learning, email One Simple Wish at info@onesimplewish.org
  • Comcast announced it would offer two months of free internet services to low-income households in its service areas.
  • AT&T is waiving internet data overage fees for customers who have capped data plans.
  • Verizon is waiving any late fees and will not terminate any service for the next 60 days.
  • Charter is offering free Spectrum broadband and Wi-Fi access for 60 days to households with K-12 and/or college students who do not already have a Spectrum broadband subscription. To enroll, call 1-844-488-8395.
  • Together We Rise developed a list of resources for foster youth categorized by state.
  • This article provides tips on how to be an advocate for foster youth.
  • The CDC provides specific guidance for households that will be helpful to foster family home providers.
  • Four ways caregivers can support college planning from home
  • The Tennessee Department of Children Services (DCS) created a COVID-19 webpage that provides information specific to DCS staff, foster parents and private providers.
  • Here’s a guide for young adults about the Economic Impact Payments provided through the Treasury in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It explains how to find out if you qualify for a payment, what to do if you don’t get one automatically, and where to get answers

State and County Actions/Resources

  • California county courts must continue to hold hearings on cases where children are in foster care or have been placed in juvenile detention, and child welfare systems must try to facilitate in-person visits for separated families, according to new rules approved by the California Judicial Council.
  • Ohio Governor Mike DeWine (R) announced on Twitter on April 24th that the state will prevent hundreds of youth from exiting the foster care system during the coronavirus outbreak.
  • The Foster Care Alumni Association of America wrote a letter to Illinois’s Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) asking for the agency to continue protecting soon-to-be 18- and 21-year-olds who are set to age out of the state’s foster care system during the coronavirus pandemic. DCFS has agreed.
  • Executive Orders related to child welfare and child protection agencies as essential government functions.
  • The Utah Department of Child and Family Services developed a COVID-19 Reference Guide for their workforce in conducting child protection services.

Policy Guidance

  • In an urgent appeal to the governor and the California state legislature on behalf of the state’s 60,000 children and young adults in foster care, a group of leading advocates is calling for sweeping new measures to ward off devastating impacts from the spread of coronavirus.
  • The Texas Public Policy Foundation called on the state’s child welfare agency to adopt a pro-parent approach during the coronavirus pandemic. The letter highlights nine recommendations, among them: expedited reunifications for some families, suspending all but the highest priority investigations of maltreatment, and suspending or changing service plans that expose parents to risk of infection.

Media Coverage

  • When Represent writer and Queens College student Marcus Diego heard that he and other foster youth were going to be kicked out of their dorms with two days’ notice and unsure about where they would go, he made sure the world knew about it.
  • Following two weeks of chaotic upheaval that felt like a personal blow to many longtime advocates in California’s child welfare circles, all employees let go in layoffs at the nationally recognized foster youth group, the California Youth Connection, have been rehired.
  • Across the country, in-person visits between parents and children were cancelled, reunifications of families were postponed, and children entered care with nowhere to go as foster families had second thoughts about taking in a child who may have been exposed to the virus.
  • Joanna Maestre shares the many struggles she faces as a foster youth given COVID-19
  • Top child welfare officials discuss the importance of protecting family integrity through COVID-19.

Week 4: Rural Populations

Resources from Organizations

  • Joe Sanfelippo (@joe_sanfelippo), Education Dive’s 2020 Superintendent of the Year, joined Future Ready’s Thomas C. Murray (@thomascmurray) to discuss how even in the midst of uncertainly, we can still find joy in the context of our work each day. Serving in a small, rural district in Wisconsin brings significant barriers during remote learning, but the Fall Creek School District staff continues to rise to the challenge
  • The Rural Community Resource Hub is an open, up-to-date resource designed to help and empower rural communities addressing COVID-19 via curated resources for families, students and educators
  • This Southern Regional Education Board blog offers suggestions to district and school leaders on how to continue rural students’ learning amid school closures
  • The Center on Rural Innovation’s maps and visualization tools provide a better understanding of the repercussions of this global health crisis for rural America
  • In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, a group of students from Harvard, MIT, Princeton, and Yale have created this free platform for pairing undergraduate mentors with K-12 students who have been affected by school closures
  • Here’s a guide for young adults about the Economic Impact Payments provided through the Treasury in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It explains how to find out if you qualify for a payment, what to do if you don’t get one automatically, and where to get answers

State and County Actions/Resources

Top Education Supports Needed Across Colorado School Districts

Policy Guidance

  • U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Perdue announces proactive flexibilities to feed children when schools close
  • This guide from the U.S. Department of Agriculture details programs that can offer immediate and long-term assistance to rural communities affected by the pandemic

Media Coverage

  • This article details the insufficient resources being provided to support African Americans, people with disabilities, and state and local governments in rural America
  • Rural college students have had to leave campus quickly due to COVID-19, with longer-term impacts on their college journeys
  • This Forbes article emphasizes the disparities between urban and rural college students, now virus intensified, noting the historical underrepresentation of rural populations in college completion rates
  • The author of this TIME article provides leaders in rural states and counties with actions they can take — right now — to help slow the spread of the virus
  • Learn about the collaboration between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a number of companies to deliver meals to students in rural schools closed due to COVID-19
  • This article traces decades of the digital divide, through four presidents, and how the lack of internet equity has affected remote instruction, leaving many schools unprepared to face the pandemic
  • Nurses who serve rural areas are concerned about students lacking access to health care during the pandemic, especially students with chronic conditions such as Type 1 diabetes or asthma
  • This article by Healthline describes the many challenges rural communities like Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, etc. are experiencing through COVID-19 including having a higher-risk population and lack of hospitals/resources
  • In this article in The Hill the potential impact of COVID-19 on rural areas is explored, as well as why rural patients need to recognize they are not immune

Week 5: First-Generation College Students

Resources from Organizations

  • State-specific resources across the education continuum, as well as policy considerations to inform the conversation of how we can learn from this unprecedented moment in our nation’s history, and bring about positive change in America’s education system
  • This interactive map by the National Conference of State Legislatures displays COVID-19 legislation, including policies related to higher education
  • This page serves as a consolidated directory of resources offered by businesses, organizations, universities, and people in response to the devastating effects of COVID-19 on first-generation and/or low-income college students across the country
  • Here’s a guide for young adults about the Economic Impact Payments provided through the Treasury in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It explains how to find out if you qualify for a payment, what to do if you don’t get one automatically, and where to get answers
  • Melissa Fries, Executive Director of a college success program, College & Alumni Program (CAP), shares insights into the many systemic challenges low-income students face through COVID-19 including financial, academic and social-emotional barriers
  • Many universities and colleges closed campus classrooms after the coronavirus spread transformed into a pandemic. This article offers a list of some major institutions that have taken action, including cancelling or temporarily suspending in-classroom instruction
  • North Carolina State University has put together a list of COVID-19 resources for first-generation college students
  • Free webcast recording from Academic Impressions – Experts connect with the higher education community to share ideas and ask questions amid the coronavirus crisis. The live webcast took place on April 1, 2020
  • This article features three innovative examples of colleges that help their most at-risk, yet high-potential students thrive
  • The Reopen Connecticut Task Force has developed a set of guidelines and procedures for reopening college campuses this fall
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is tracking colleges’ plans for the fall
  • A report by Student Ready Strategies outlines considerations for colleges and universities in post-pandemic higher education

State and County Actions/Resources

  • The entire California State University system has announced they will continue online-only courses in fall 2020
  • Pending in the New York State Senate is Senate Bill S8107 that would require SUNY and CUNY schools to refund students for housing credits and boarding charges used or charged for the period of time when such schools are closed or shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic
  • California’s state colleges will receive $2 billion less next year; however, the spending cuts largely spared financial aid for students at public institutions
  • House Bill 870 introduced to the Louisiana State Legislature provides modifications for the application and approval process for the Taylor Opportunity Program for Students (TOPS) scholarship program. Waives some requirements and extends deadlines including for ACT/SAT testing (Pending)
  • Senate Bill SB481 introduced to the Louisiana State Senate requires postsecondary education management boards to adopt policies to address the negative impacts on postsecondary students, faculty, and other employees by the public health emergency declared by the governor in response to COVID -19
  • A bill introduced in New Jersey’s legislature would require colleges to refund students 25% of their tuition and fees for courses that were moved online this spring because of the pandemic (Pending)
  • Senate Bill S88271 introduced to the New York State Senate provides financial aid grants (up to $1,500) to individuals who served as essential workers during the state of emergency declared as a result of COVID-19 and are seeking college education or career education and training (Pending)
  • The California Community Colleges system is suing the U.S. Department of Education over its decision to prevent undocumented students, among others, from receiving CARES Act emergency aid
  • The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (Commission) and Council for Community and Technical College Education (Council) voted to provide students with greater flexibilities in accessing and renewing state financial aid programs

Policy Guidance

  • The U.S. Department of Education issued guidance Friday that extended temporary flexibilities around distance education through the end of the year
  • The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights has issued guidance for colleges to comply with federal disability and sex discrimination laws during the shift to online instruction
  • The Department of Education has issued guidance to allow institutions to continue paying students Federal Work-Study wages during campus closures due to coronavirus, under certain circumstances

Media Coverage

  • This article talks about the challenges young people face getting to college, and how coronavirus has exacerbated such challenges
  • As colleges consider their options to ensure they protect the well-being of everyone on campus, they must consider the needs of all students
  • Luis Gallardo, a first-generation low-income college student at the University of California at Berkeley shares his story of how the pandemic and school closures have impacted his learning
  • Thousands of low-income students are deferring and dropping college plans, indicate multiple student surveys. Or, they are scaling back from a four-year college to a community college, where the odds of ever earning a four-year degree plummet.
  • In interviews with ABC News, first-generation college students from low-income families across the country described an abrupt financial shock from COVID-19 that’s threatened to upend their dreams. Additionally, ABC also surprised students with letters from their parents (see below)